Employer Sponsored Plans

Qualified Retirement Plans

Money Purchase Plans

A money purchase plan is a pension plan that has a mandatory annual contribution. The contribution formula is established in the plan document however company contributions can be as high as 25% of pay. Employers also have the option of making all contributions subject to a vesting schedule.

Profit Sharing Plans

For businesses with a number of part-time employees or high employee turnover, or those needing the freedom of variable contributions, a Profit-sharing plan may be the perfect answer.

  • Discretionary contributions of up to 25% of compensation (20% of net profits for a self-employed person)
  • The potential to exclude part-time and seasonal workers, depending on the eligibility requirements you select
  • Choice of vesting schedules may be available
  • Loans and hardship withdrawals may be available
  • The option of Social Security integration

401(k) Plans

A 401(k) plan allows participants to contribute a portion of their pre-tax salary to a tax-deferred retirement plan. Some companies may provide a matching option to their employees as an extra incentive for the participants to contribute. All plans are subject to discrimination testing to ensure all plan participants are receiving equal benefit.

  • Salary deferral contributions as well as employer contributions
  • $16,500 salary deferral limit
  • “Catch-up” contribution of $5,500 for those ages 50 and older
  • Contributions may be split between Traditional 401(k) plans and Roth 401(k) plans. Employer contributions are treated as Traditional 401(k) contributions
  • Safe Harbor option for small businesses to ensure plan passes all discrimination testing

Roth 401(k)s

Similar to a basic Roth-IRA, Roth 401(k) contributions are made with after-tax dollars and are eligible to grow tax free. Unlike a Roth-IRA, participants may contribute regardless of how much they earn. A Roth 401(k) must be combined with a Individual (k) or a 401(k) plan and cannot be established on its own.

  • Salary deferral contributions only
  • $16,500 contribution limit
  • “Catch-up” contribution of $5,500 for those ages 50 and older
  • Contributions may be split between Traditional 401(k) plans and Roth 401(k) plans. Employer contributions are treated as Traditional 401(k) contributions

403(b) Plans

A 403(b) plan is a tax-favored retirement plan for employees of school systems, nonprofit organizations, or other tax-exempt employers (know as 501(c)(3) organizations). Participants can make pre-tax contributions and some organization even provide a matching incentive to their employees.

  • Employee pre-tax contributions are immediately vested
  • Employer matching contributions may be subject to a vesting schedule